THE Garlic (Allium sativum L.) – A Promising Anti-cancer Drug

  • Sama Venkatesh G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India
  • Ayesha Aleem Ullah G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India
  • Mohammed Owaisuddin G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India
  • Rajesh Bolledu Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, West Bengal-700 091, India
  • A Ravi Kiran G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

Abstract

Globally cancer is the leading cause of death. The popular treatments in cancer therapies areradiation, surgery, chemo-therapy, involves high risk and expensive. The present day, modern cancer therapies are associated with several toxicities and lack of quality of life. Herbal remedies for cancer treatment are found notion to the Oncologists. Garlic known as Allium sativum (Family: Liliaceae), is one of the promising drug found to treat cancer patients and also to treat the toxicity effects produced by other cancer treatment. By consuming garlic regularly it shows protection to cancer and many ailments. Allicin is a major pharmacological component of garlic, reported to have anti-cancer properties and also used to treat drug-induced toxicity.

Keywords: Oncologists, Garlic, Liliaceae, Allium sativum.

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Author Biographies

Sama Venkatesh, G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

Ayesha Aleem Ullah, G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

Mohammed Owaisuddin, G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

Rajesh Bolledu, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, West Bengal-700 091, India

Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, West Bengal-700 091, India

A Ravi Kiran, G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

G. Pulla Reddy College of Pharmacy, Mehdipatnam, Hyderabad-500 028, Telangana, India

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Venkatesh, S., Aleem Ullah, A., Owaisuddin, M., Bolledu, R., & Kiran, A. (2021). THE Garlic (Allium sativum L.) – A Promising Anti-cancer Drug. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, 9(3), 154-159. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.22270/ajprd.v9i3.932