Necessity, Importance, Future Aspects and Challenges of Pharmacovigilance

  • Shaikh Sameena Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.
  • Sameer Shafi Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.
  • Dhumal P.B Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.

Abstract

Pharmacovigilance (PV) is kind of a sunshade to clarify the processes for observance and evaluating Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) and it’s a key part of effective drug regulation systems, clinical follow and public health programs. Spontaneous news of ADRs could be an important part of PV & it becomes a major disadvantage in developing countries. Knowledge of PV might sort the thought for interventions aimed toward up news rates and decreasing ADRs. PV could be an important and integral part of clinical analysis & it jointly plays employment among the help system through observance and interaction of medication and there effects among the body. Nowadays in state, PV provides awareness relating to ADRs and this review provides knowledge relating to implementation for determination of current problems. India’s rising stage; there is heaps to be done and told, the sphere of PV, in ensuring that the safe implementation of the activities and work done is achieved. Their increasing kind of hospitalization of patients as a results of ADRs and it becomes a challenge to hunt out the precise cause, once a patient is treated with multiple medication at a similar time. PV helps in safe and convenient use of pharmaceutical medication. The foremost objective of PV is that the assessment of benefit-risk profile of drug for higher potency and safety in patients. This review explains the need of Pharmacovigilance in companies, its growth in various centuries and current standing among the country.


 

Keywords: Pharmacovigilance, ADRs,Medication, Hospitalization etc.

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Author Biographies

Shaikh Sameena, Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.

Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.

Sameer Shafi, Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.

Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.

Dhumal P.B, Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.

Shivlingeshwar College of Pharmacy, Almala Dist. Latur, Maharashtra (MH), India.

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Sameena, S., Shafi, S., & P.B, D. (2022). Necessity, Importance, Future Aspects and Challenges of Pharmacovigilance. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, 10(6), 110-119. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.22270/ajprd.v10i6.1202